Estimates show that U.S. companies could save up to 28 billion gallons of water per year if they optimize cooling in their buildings. That’s as much as over 750,000 Americans use at home in a year! Environmental Defense Fund worked with AT&T to develop a framework and set of tools that can help your company reduce its water use from cooling and manage its water risk.
water efficiency toolkit (x)
imagewin:

A wave viewed from underwater

imagewin:

A wave viewed from underwater

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Robots automate testing for bacteria, including coliforms

space-robotics:

Taihei Environmental Science Center has developed a system that automatically performs water quality testing, and can detect bacteria such as E. coli. In the past, this work had to be done manually. The system uses three robots to completely automate all stages of the process, from…

Neat!

pimpmyycamel:

Darbandikhan, Iraq | Source

Is this the big lake?

pimpmyycamel:

Darbandikhan, Iraq | Source

Is this the big lake?

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Real Time Fresh Water Sewage Monitoring

Water Access and Monitoring Applications List

Looking for a public drinking fountain? WeTap can help if you have an Android device. iOS functionality coming soon.

Wondering about the drinking water quality of a place you are visiting? mWater is building an open source database of global drinking water resources.

On the conservation side of the conversation is Driblet. Installation requires plumbing expertise which was a deterrent in consumer adaptation during beta testing however the team is focusing on larger entities with more incentive to reduce water bills.  

Know of additional applications to expand on this list then please reach out. 


While living in Tokyo, Philipp Hutfless, an industrial designer from Germany, saw how much food the Japanese import from abroad. The industrialized nation just doesn’t have a lot of room for agriculture, neither in rural areas nor in cities.
His response was to develop Vereos, an idea for coastal cities with limited space for growing food. It’s a floating greenhouse that recycles freshwater and gets power from built-in solar panels.

Ben Shiller for Fast Co-Exist (x)

While living in Tokyo, Philipp Hutfless, an industrial designer from Germany, saw how much food the Japanese import from abroad. The industrialized nation just doesn’t have a lot of room for agriculture, neither in rural areas nor in cities.

His response was to develop Vereos, an idea for coastal cities with limited space for growing food. It’s a floating greenhouse that recycles freshwater and gets power from built-in solar panels.

Ben Shiller for Fast Co-Exist (x)

Water is a complex area for green bonds as projects can have conflicting environmental and social outcomes. For example, the provision of clean water has obvious social benefits, but there are lots of good and bad choices that can be made towards that end. Water-provision investments can range from building a new reservoir and long aqueducts for transporting water, to reducing pipeline leaks (which can be vast in old and leaky city systems) and introducing better demand management measures.

The wrong decisions can end up over-using limited water resources in areas beginning to suffer decreased or more volatile rainfall as a result of climate change - and can lead to spikes in energy consumption just as we need to cut back to reduce emissions. Water infrastructure is a huge consumer of electricity - for example 17% of California’s electricity is used to shift water around the State. Yes, that’s right, 17%!

Bridget Boulle and Sean Kidney for Climate Bonds (x)

The Ocean Cleanup Array works by anchoring a network of floating booms, which collect and process trash in a central platform. The idea received some criticism, so a year-long study was launched to determine if the idea could really work. The research shows that not only could the idea work, but the Ocean Cleanup Array could suck up half of the Pacific Garbage patch in just 10 years. Without funding, however, the problem will just continue to grow. (x)

credit: natgeo (x)

The problem isn’t the ancient art of aquaculture per se; it’s the rapid intensification of it. Chinese farmers started raising carp in their rice fields at least 2,500 years ago. But with that country’s aquacultural output now at 42 million tons a year, fish pens line many rivers, lakes, and seashores. Farmers stock their ponds with fast-growing breeds of carp and tilapia and use concentrated fish feed to maximize their growth.

credit: natgeo (x)

The problem isn’t the ancient art of aquaculture per se; it’s the rapid intensification of it. Chinese farmers started raising carp in their rice fields at least 2,500 years ago. But with that country’s aquacultural output now at 42 million tons a year, fish pens line many rivers, lakes, and seashores. Farmers stock their ponds with fast-growing breeds of carp and tilapia and use concentrated fish feed to maximize their growth.